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WCRP Working Group on Coupled Modeling

WGCM-Endorsed Community Coordinated Projects

WGCM-endorsed community coordinated projects are those modeling activities encouraged by WGCM and synergistically built on the CMIP5 experiment framework:

Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate MIP (ACC-MIP)
Climate-system Historical Forecast Project (CHFP)
Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP)
Coordinated Regional climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX)
Coupled Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project C4MIP
Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)
Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP)
Transpose Atmposphere Model Intercomparison Project (Transpose-AMIP)

 

Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate MIP (ACC-MIP)

Contact: Jean-Francois Lamarque

The ACC-MIP activity aims at supportng the IPCC AR5 climate simulations with input and special simulation studies related to atmospheric chemistry in the troposphere and stratosphere. Close links have been established with the CCMVal activity, which has started a multi-model assessment of stratospheric ozone changes and AEROCOM, which aims at assessing the state-of-the-art in modelling tropospheric aerosol distribution and composition.


Climate-system Historical Forecast Project (CHFP)

Contact: Ben Kirtman

A multi-model and multi-institutional experimental framework for sub-seasonal to decadal complete physical climate system prediction. By the complete physical climate system, we mean contributions from the atmosphere, oceans, land surface cryosphere and atmospheric composition in producing regional and sub-seasonal to decadal climate anomalies. This experimental framework is based on advances in climate research during the past decade, which have lead to the understanding that modeling and predicting a given climate anomaly over any region is incomplete without a proper treatment of the effects of SST, sea ice, snow cover, soil wetness, vegetation, stratospheric processes, and atmospheric composition (carbon dioxide, ozone, etc.).

The observed current climate changes are a combination of anthropogenic influences and natural variability. In addition to possible anthropogenic influence on climate due to changing the atmospheric composition, it is quite likely that land use in the tropics will undergo extensive changes, which will lead to significant changes in the biophysical properties of the land surface, which in turn will impact atmospheric variability on sub-seasonal to decadal time scales. It is therefore essential that the past research by two somewhat non-interacting communities (i.e., climate change and seasonal prediction) be merged into a focused effort to understand the predictability of the complete climate system.


Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP)

Contact: Mark Webb, Hadley Centre (mark.webb@metoffice.gov.uk)

Overview:
The Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) is a WCRP sponsored research project specially focussed to provide a systematic intercomparison of cloud feedbacks in climate models as part of a programme to provide continuing documentation of the strength of cloud feedbacks in climate models and an evaluation of the performance of climate models in simulating aspects of clouds that are important in cloud feedback.

The proposal consists of two main parts, one with a heavy link between models and observations and the other an intercomparison between models.

The first part of the proposal calls for a more complete investigation of the behaviour of clouds in climate models as compared to ISCCP data.

The second part of the proposal calls for systematic model experiments of two types, the first type (using perturbation to the SST as a "forcing" to an atmosphere only model) is mainly to provide a link to previous intercomparisons conducted by Cess and collaborators (Cess, 1990 and 1996); the second type (using a slab ocean model interacting with an atmospheric model) is expected to become the "standard" over the next decade.

It is also suggested that a range of "cloud feedbacks experiments" be conducted with cloud resolving models, active participation of GEWEX GCSS is sought.

References:
McAvaney, B.J. and Le Treut, H. The Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project: (CFMIP). In CLIVAR Exchanges - supplementary contributions, 26, March 2003

K. D. Williams, M. A. Ringer, C. A . Senior, M. J. Webb, B. J. McA vaney, S. Bony, N. Andronova, S . Emori, R. Gudgel, T. Knutson, B. Li, K. Lo, I. Musat, J. Wegner, A. Slingo, and J. F. B. Mitchell. Evaluation of a component of the cloud response to climate change in an intercomparison of climate models. Clim. Dyn., In Press, 2005.

M. J. Webb, C. A. Senior, K. D. Williams, M. D. H. Sexton, M. A. Ringer, B. J. McAvaney, R. Colman, B. J. Soden, N. G. Andronova, S. Emori, Y. Tsushima, T. Ogura, I. Musat, S. Bony, and K. Taylor. On uncertainty in feedback mechanisms controlling climate sensitivity in two GCM ensembles. Clim. Dyn., Submitted, 2005.


Coordinated Regional climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX)

The COordinated Regional climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) framework aims to improve coordination of international efforts in regional climate downscaling (RCD) research, including both dynamical and statistical methods.


Coupled Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project (C4MIP)

Contact: Pierre Friedlingstein (pierre@lsce.saclay.cea.fr)

Overview:
The Coupled Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project (C4MIP) is designed to compare and analyze the feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate in the presence of external climate forcing. Such feedbacks are likely to be mediated on the one hand by altered forcing of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles and on the other by the impact of altered CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere resulting from this forcing. The basic approach is to include models of the terrestrial and ocean carbon cycles in existing OAGCMs and run the augmented model with and without these feedbacks active.


Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

GeoMIP attempts to address the question, "What are the expected climate effects of geoengineering?" Multiple groups in the past have conducted climate model simulations of geoengineering, but very few of them have done the same experiment, which makes it difficult to determine which features in the results are actually due to geoengineering and which are specific to the model on which the simulation was conducted. GeoMIP serves to organize geoengineering simulations by prescribing the experiments which all participating climate models will perform.

The first suite of GeoMIP experiments concentrates on Solar Radiation Management (SRM) schemes.


Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP)

Contact: Sylvie Joussaume (sjpmip@lsce.saclay.cea.fr)

Overview:
This international project involves about 18 modeling groups (USA, Canada, UK, Germany, France, Australia, Japan and Korea) (Joussaume and Taylor, 1995). This project is endorsed by both the International Geosphere Biosphere Project (under PAst Global ChangES) and the World Climate Research Program (within the Working Group on Coupled Models) and its aims are to evaluate climate models under paleoclimate conditions and improve our understanding of past climate. Following an initial phase during which boundary conditions were defined and simulations were completed, the PMIP participants have met every two years since 1995 in order to discuss the results. These workshops have fostered cooperation and forged collaborations among groups working on the two PMIP periods. Discussions at the workshops were not limited to the PMIP experiments themselves, but also to the many complementary numerical experiments performed for the mid Holocene and last glacial maximum climatic periods. This has helped to enhance our knowledge as is reflected within this report of the third PMIP workshop. Three PMIP experiments have been defined : one for the mid Holocene, 6000 years BP, and two experiments for the last glacial maximum (LGM), 21,000 years BP (18 000 radiocarbon date (Bard, et al., 1990)), either with atmosphere alone models or with atmosphere models coupled to surface ocean models.

References:
Joussaume, S. and K. E. Taylor, 1995: Status of the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP). Proceedings of the first international AMIP scientific conference. WCRP Report, 425-430.

Braconnot, P., ed., 2000: PMIP, Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP): Proceedings of the 3rd PMIP workshop, Canada, 4-8 October 1999, WCRP-111, WMO/TD-1007, 271pp.


Transpose Atmoshere Model Intercomparison Project (Transpose-AMIP)

Contact: Keith Williams (keith.williams@metoffice.gov.uk)

Overview:
Transpose-AMIP is a WMO Working Group on Numerical Experiments (WGNE) and Working Group on Coupled Models (WGCM) endorsed activity to run climate models in weather-forecasts mode. Running weather forecasts (or more correctly hindcasts, as they are run retrospectively) with climate models enables detailed evaluation of the processes operating through a comparison of the model with a variety of observations for particular meteorological events. In addition understanding the development of biases as they grow from a well initialised state can provide significant insight into the cause of those biases, which can be used in the future development of the model. Many of the principal sources of model spread in terms of simulating climate and climate change are 'fast-processes' (e.g. clouds), hence examining and intercomparing climate models on these fast timescales could yield greater understanding of why their longer timescale response differs.

The transpose-AMIP project began with a pilot project (the CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT)) which trialled the approach in the USA using the NCAR model (Phillips et al., 2004). The transpose-AMIP phase I experiment followed and was performed by 6 modelling centres with analysis focussed on the Southern Great Plains ARM site. Now that the concept has been proven and benefits already being realised as indicated by the list of references which follow, the intention for phase II of the project is to expand the data collection to be global with more diagnostics being saved, more modelling groups to taking part, and for more analysis of the data to take place.

References:
Phillips, T.J., G.L. Potter, D.L. Williamson, R.T. Cederwall, J.S. Boyle, M. Fiorino, J.J. Hnilo, J.G. Olson, S. Xie, and J.J. Yio, 2004: Evaluating Parameterizations in General Circulation Models: Climate Simulation Meets Weather Prediction. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 85, 1903–1915.

 

 

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